Tips For Better Wild Bird Photography

Capturing bird photos can be challenging at times, but with good preparation, the right equipment and a few simple tips, it can also be quite fun and rewarding.  Following are the few tips that helps you to take better photographs:-

Know Your Venue: If you wish to capture wild bird pictures, the first thing you need to do is get to know your venue.

Acording to Daniel Mule, First up, do some research and find out what species you’re likely to spot. From there you can work out where and when you’re likely to find them.

Daniel is arguably one of the foremost wildlife photographers. He is passionate about birds and is specializing in bird photography. In documenting birds through his photographs, he has developed a style of technical excellence combined with a captivating story.

His journey included carrying his photography equipment and outdoor gear up high mountain peaks, across lakes and rivers, and over glaciers and lava fields.

Know Your Subject:-  Birds are incredibly fast and often seem totally unpredictable, so the better you get to know them, the better your chances of anticipating their behaviour and getting the shot you want.The more time you spend observing the birds, the better you’ll be able to predict their behaviour, and it will give them more time to get used to you.

Buy the Longest Fastest Lens You Can Afford:-   Some of the best bird photographers will use nothing more than a standard 100mm-400mm telephoto and they get incredible results. In fact most will tell you it’s more about the preparation &research, good positioning and using patient stalking techniques.

Daniel Mule has a good instinct for creative details, especially the ones that will grab the attention of his target audience. He uses photographs from his eye-catching and broad body of work to illustrate his accumulated wisdom and instructive anecdotes.

He walks the reader through the cropping and culling process, and enlightens the rigorous and considerate approach to editing behind the singular and vivid images.

So in a perfect world, all bird photographers would have a 600mm f4 auto focus lens, but realistically, anything over 300mm is probably good enough if you hone your other birding skills.

Camera Settings:-

Digital ISO settings allow you to speed things up considerably, just be aware of how fast you can go before the picture quality suffers, click here to read more .